Simpson College is showcasing the eye-catching artwork of Des Moines-based artist Emily Newman at the Farnham Galleries to begin the new year. The exhibition is set to appear from Jan. 11-Feb. 17, 2021.

An assistant professor of art at Drake University, Newman’s artwork is made using only found and recycled packaging. This approach serves as an observed commentary on both climate change and the domestic habits of consumption.

“From pre-packaged toddler snacks to battery blister packs, I find value in the non-momentous aspects of life," Newman said. "I contrast this value, usually personal or considered simply waste, with formats that allude to objects of monetary value – retail sales displays and things contained in product packaging."

Newman’s recent exhibitions include works shown at the Site:Brooklyn Gallery in New York and a solo exhibition at the Blanden Museum of Art in Ft. Dodge, Iowa. In 2020, she curated a contemporary textiles and fibers exhibition at Drake University’s Anderson Gallery, funded by a project grant from the Iowa Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Located on the third floor of Mary Berry Hall, the Farnham Galleries are free and open to the public. Hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday. Special accommodation requests can be sent to Justin Nostrala, professor of graphic design, at justin.nostrala@simpson.edu. Due to COVID-19, Simpson College is requiring that all campus visitors wear a mask.

For more information, visit the Farnham Galleries website at simpson.edu/farnham-galleries.

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